Leadership

EQ: Necessary Emotions for a Leader

While most people recognize that a leader’s mood has a major impact on their team and others, we’re just now beginning to focus our attention on ways to improve. The research in the field of emotion has revealed insight into not only how to measure the impact of a leader’s emotions, but also how the best leaders have found effective ways to understand and improve the way they handle their own and other people’s emotions.

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Where is your business headed?

Business owners and executives across the country struggle to answer this question. Most make some comment that they are moving forward and growing. Others say they think everyone in the company knows where they are going. Yet when asked, employees respond by saying, “Wherever the company tells me we’re going.”

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Rapidity

[Ra•pid•i•ty]: noun
The quality of moving or reacting with great speed.

Is your company prepared?

We know that organizations have always needed people who are good at leading. Though we often hire and promote people who have been good managers and adequate leaders, it is now essential to find great leaders. The future of our organizations need leaders who will prepare us for the future.

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Who is responsible for your career development?

There are all kinds of studies that show the main reasons people leave their jobs. One of the top reasons in almost every study is for lack of career development. So as an employee, you might ask yourself, “Who is responsible for my career development?”

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True Leadership: Be the Example

Our country has gone through some of the most trying times we’ve seen in years. Hurricanes Harvey and Irma mark the first time two Atlantic Category 4s have made U.S. landfall in the same year. Together, Harvey and Irma are estimated to have caused between $150 billion and $200 billion in damages, which is more than the $160 billion that Katrina caused. Between the loss of lives, the major flooding, and an unknown number of people affected by these storms, we can easily call this a catastrophe.

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Conflict: Moving from Cowardice to Confidence

Experiencing conflict is a part of everyday life. A common response is avoidance. Most people say they just don’t like confrontation. It makes them uncomfortable, and some even become physically ill at the thought of discussing a challenging issue face-to-face. How then can you become more productive with conflict while still keeping your emotions in check?

Healthy and productive conflict can lead to:

  • Better relationships
  • Increased confidence
  • Decreased anger and depression
  • Greater respect for yourself and from others
  • Career development
  • Harmony
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Employee Evaluations: Getting a “Kick Start”

Of all of the tasks required of a supervisor, writing Employee Evaluations is one we hear most often dreaded. Some of the typical complaints we hear are:

  • “I don’t know where to start.”
  • “I have employees that have worked here for years and there is nothing new for them.”
  • “I have several to do at a time and by the end, they all start looking the same.”

Most supervisors have been there…blank employee evaluations staring back at you just waiting to be completed. It’s only marginally better if it’s electronic. You know the benefit of annual evaluations, yet they just keep being placed further back on the burner. Inspiration can be difficult to come by at the end of a long day, and often a kick start can help with the “blank page (or screen) syndrome.”

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The Value of Dutiful Followers

Doris was the type of employee you could set your watch to. She arrived at 7:50am each day and left no later than 5:10pm. Her day was spent doing administrative work—much of it routine, identical to the day before, and the day before that. The phone would ring from time to time and there would be the occasional office party. But for the most part, each day was remarkably indistinguishable from the day before.

Through the years everyone got used to her reaction to change. If her schedule was interrupted, you needed to give at least a 48 hour notice. Larger interruptions, such as painting the office or a software upgrade would require a series of one-to-one meetings, coddling, and accommodation. A request to increase her workload or take on a new challenge would typically be met with a one word response, “No.” That usually meant someone else would have to pick up the slack.

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The Slight Edge: Just One More…

It’s a common perception that there is a big gap between “average people” and “successful people.” Some people are just able to get better results and make more money, yet they put in the same or even fewer hours. So what’s the difference? The answer lies in The Slight Edge, a concept from Jeff Olson’s book.

In major league baseball, a batter who gets two hits out of every ten times at bat is called a .200 hitter. This batter, within a very short period of time would likely be looking for a job outside of baseball or returned to the minor leagues. On the other hand, a hitter who gets just three hits out of every ten times at bat is a .300 hitter and is considered a great success, and if he continues to improve, he is destined for the Hall of Fame.

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Management Teams Aren’t Productive

Recently, while working with an executive team, I posed the question, “How productive are you?” They all looked at me as though I had three heads. Then gave me the list of things they are doing. Appointments and meetings they have scheduled. So I pressed on.

“What are you doing that is moving your team and/or the business forward or toward achieving the strategic goals?” Needless to say, what followed was a lengthy discussion.

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