Recent Posts

Lessons from Dad, CEO: Hiring Family Members

Lesson One: Every family member earns their position. No free rides. A guide to hiring family members.

Parents are parents forever. That’s a given. As parents, we want to give our children every opportunity to be successful. Why not? We have nurtured them, guided them, and taught them; all in hopes that one day they will grow up, be successful and contribute to society. And we have to protect them. We don’t want any harm to come of them. No hurt feelings, no life setbacks. In that endeavor, as an owner of a family business, we have resources available to us to create opportunities for our children to become successful. And this is an opportunity they may not have in other companies. We’re very good at utilizing all of our resources! So we end up hiring family members.

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#AskRevela – Upward Communication

Let us be your leadership “Google.” Ask Revela!

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Tired of Chasing Squirrels?

Have you ever watched a dog laying casually in the yard when suddenly, something catches his attention? A squirrel! He’s no longer interested in basking in the sunlight because he’s going to GET THAT SQUIRREL! He stops what he was doing and chases the squirrel. And most often he doesn’t catch it. Still, he stands at the bottom of the tree for a good amount of time, wondering (I’m guessing here) if he can climb the tree…or hoping the squirrel will magically slip off the branch and fall into his mouth.

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#AskRevela – Engagement

When you have a question about anything, where do you turn? Why is my car making this noise? What does your cough really mean? How do I get these bumps off my child’s arm? What should you do if your boss won’t…? Most of us turn to Google. Or we ask Alexa or Siri. We end up getting so much information; sometimes too much. So why not let us be your leadership “Google?” Ask Revela!

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This Simple Solution Can Increase Retention

It’s the question every business owner or HR person asks. It’s the question that many businesses struggle with. How can we increase retention and decrease employee turnover? So maybe you have already figured out how to find great people. But the problem for many companies is this: They can’t figure out how to keep them. “New research from Allegis Group reports that 83% of 1,400 employers surveyed believe retaining talent is a growing challenge.”

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Creating an Employee Experience

It’s an experience. A single moment that makes a person feel something. A feeling that a person associates with something. Many successful companies create experiences for customers to delight them and increase loyalty.

For decades, we’ve known that we not only need to deliver a quality product or service, but that we need to focus on the customer experience. But what we have unintentionally ignored is the fact that employees are expecting the same. We’re not talking about massage therapists and bowling alleys necessarily; but employees want to feel good working for your company.

It’s not just about culture or employee engagement. It’s not just the small benefits or perks you offer. It is about designing work for and around the people who work for you. And about making sure your team wants to come to work. Making sure they actually enjoy working for your company. For over ten years now, Glassdoor has released an annual list of the “Best Places to Work” based upon the overall employee experience. According to an article by Forbes, the factors that contribute to this ranking are “overall satisfaction, career opportunities, compensation, work-life balance, and business outlook.” They also include a ranking for each company’s CEO and even the interview process.

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Shake It Up…

Disrupting the Org Chart

During a recent conversation with the leaders of a company, we asked them to imagine that their department was not a part of the overall company, but a stand-alone business having to provide value to its customers and make money to continue. Then we asked the question, “How would you organize the company related to positions, roles, and responsibilities? And how would you measure effectiveness?” This is what we call disrupting the org chart.

Some leaders had to be reminded that every minute someone is working costs money. They then considered how to measure productivity in service-related areas. They recognized that their employees tend to come to work and most are busy. But they’re not necessarily busy with things that are high-payoff or things that move the needle, related to value and time. They came in to do their job.

Also, they recognized that they were not asking their (internal) customers what was needed from them as a department. They simply were doing their job and finding ways to make their job easier; not really considering how it affected others. There was no system in place to continually assess needs and effectiveness as things changed for their customers.

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