Company Culture

Burnout At Work: What To Do About It

Imagine this all-too-familiar scenario. You work a full-time job, maybe even a little more. On top of just doing your job, you’re managing a team of other people, also trying to get them to do their jobs. And maybe you’ve got kids at home, so not only are you working and managing people, you’re a full-time parent who has to cook, clean, do laundry, and attend soccer practices.

Even though you’re trying your best, you just feel like you’re always struggling. Always tired. Always have something else you have to do. It’s getting harder for you to wake up in the morning; your workload is getting heavier, and your supervisor is requesting that you complete more projects in less time. It seems like you are constantly on the go, you have no time for yourself, and you don’t see an end in sight. You’re drowning in your own hectic life… We’ve all been there.

Leading a life like the scenario we just described can be stressful, and most of you are likely experiencing a similar situation. You can overly exhaust yourself; both body and mind. This leads to burnout. Burnout can be used in many different contexts; some may even consider it today’s latest “trend.” But in all actuality, burnout at work is a serious condition. It’s nothing to be ashamed of. Everyone has experienced it at one point or another.

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#AskRevela – Toxic Boss

Let us be your leadership “Google.” Ask Revela!

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Why Your Ping Pong Tables Aren’t Working

Let’s get real about corporate culture

You have no idea why your culture sucks. It just does. You bought the ping-pong tables. You started Happy Hour Fridays. And you even do the obligatory birthday cakes for your employees. Yet, people just don’t click. They can’t communicate. Your turnover rates are on the rise and the employees you do keep just don’t seem like they want to be there. Getting people to work together, collaborate, and have a normal conversation is like pulling teeth. And those words you had so beautifully hung on the wall seem meaningless.

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Making Work Meaningful: Inspire. Engage. Ignite.

For years, company leaders have had the belief that employees can be motivated by more money. If they’re not happy with their jobs, just give them a raise! But studies have shown that this method of motivation doesn’t always work. It’s about making work meaningful for your employees. Think about it. What makes you get out of bed and come to work every day? What drives you to stay late working on a project with your team?

Dan Ariely, a behavioral economist and speaker, says the answer is that we care about reaching the end. We care about the fight and the challenge of getting there. We care about making our lives meaningful. And that means that you, as a leader, should also be making work meaningful for those you lead.

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Hiring Assessments: Are They Right For You?

Let’s talk about your hiring process. What does it look like? It probably consists of an application of some sort, an interview or two, a background check, and a salary negotiation. Does it also include a hiring assessment? If not, you could be losing money.

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Have You Created Your Individual Development Plan?

If you do research on how to create an individual development plan (IDP), you’ll probably notice that the advice you find is typically offered to a leader or manager, helping to develop an IDP for their employee.

They all start with the notion that first, you should know where the business is going and then talk with your employee about the future. Next, it’ll walk you through determining what the person is missing (gap analysis). Finally, it ends with creating a training plan and applying it. You might even find some lists that have a few more steps, but the majority contain at least those steps.

But why wait for your manager to create an Individual Development Plan?

Managers are busy. Sometimes they are lucky to get 1:1 meetings done, let alone helping someone write a plan to develop their career. So our advice? Take your future into your own hands and get started.

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Executives are the Reason Development Efforts Fail

This might be a touchy subject. But we have to say it. You are the reason your people aren’t learning, growing, and fully engaging.

Picture this all-too-familiar scenario. An employee is struggling to get things done. He’s missing deadlines and always seems rushed or stressed, especially if you ask him to do anything extra. His manager notices these behaviors and immediately diagnoses the problem. He picks up the phone. “Um, yes, HR Person, John needs time management training. What can we offer?”

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The Importance of Developing High Potentials

Why should you develop high potential employees? This seems like a ridiculous question.  Isn’t it obvious why you should develop your high potentials? Yet so many companies take their high potentials for granted.  It’s easy to do.  Think about these individuals in your organization.  They often outwork their peers, get along well with others and, usually, if they want or need to learn something, they’ll take it upon themselves to figure it out.  They ask the right questions, don’t create drama, and are all-in. Let’s call them our HPs.

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Transforming the Employee Evaluation

As a supervisor, giving an employee evaluation can be dreadful. You start by staring at yet another blank form. You go through each performance category, carefully marking your choice of below average, average, or above average. And when done, you recheck your responses, making sure that the report is “balanced.” Too many low marks, and your employee might be upset. Too many high and there is nowhere to aspire. What is the answer? Rank the employee in the middle…the sweet spot! Not hanging back, not showing off. The solution is average.

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Do You Need an Executive Coach?

When you’re in a position of authority, people have a tendency to tell you what you want to hear; or at least be very “calculated” about how they share feedback with you. An executive coach can provide more honest and direct feedback.

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