Retaining Employees

Too Little Too Late…

3 Minute Read

Recently, a client had a key employee resign unexpectedly, and they were left scratching their heads wondering what went wrong. They had big plans for this employee in the future.  In fact, they had discussed this during many of our leadership team group sessions.  When the employee put in his resignation, it felt a bit like a punch in the gut. The leadership team felt that they had invested so much time into this employee. They asked us to conduct an exit interview in hopes of learning from the situation, so they don’t repeat the same mistakes.

During the exit interview, the employee reported that he felt like he had plateaued in his current role. And he wasn’t sure what career path the company had in mind for him. It made our hearts sink a little because we heard the leaders of the organization discuss the plans for his future. But they quickly discovered that they never clearly laid out that plan to the most important person: THE EMPLOYEE!

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How to Keep Remote Employees Engaged

4 Minute Read

Telecommuting…sounds like something from the future. However, it is one of the most challenging issues for businesses today. Employees want flexible work schedules and work hours. And many companies are trying to make it a priority and allow employees to work remotely. Some have even gone as far as hiring full remote teams that work in different states across the country.

Having remote employees can be a benefit to both the employee and the company. The employee finds harmony by being able to have a professional career, as well as more time for activities outside of work. They have the choice to work for an organization halfway across the country, giving them unlimited possibilities. The company can benefit from this as well. It reduces overhead costs and they are able to have access to more talent that otherwise may not have been an option to them. And technology has given us this alternative; it’s a beautiful thing. But as with all new things, there are some obstacles to overcome, such as how to keep remote employees engaged.

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4 Easy Ways to Develop Bench Strength

5 Minute Read

If you’re a business leader, it’s safe to believe that you understand the need for, and the benefits of, succession planning. So, for the purpose of this article, we won’t spend much time addressing them. What we will highlight, however, are a few ingredients that are necessary in order to develop bench strength for your key employees. In sports, the definition of bench strength is “the quality and number of players available to substitute during the game”. In business, there’s a bit more focus on the quality piece; but really, the concept is the same. The purpose is to have people ready to step into a different role when a leadership or key position becomes available or when a new role is needed.

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#AskRevela – Toxic Boss

5 Minute Read

Let us be your leadership “Google.” Ask Revela!

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Hiring Assessments: Are They Right For You?

4 Minute Read

Let’s talk about your hiring process. What does it look like? It probably consists of an application of some sort, an interview or two, a background check, and a salary negotiation. Does it also include a hiring assessment? If not, you could be losing money.

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A Plan for Succession

3 Minute Read

WE’VE ALL BEEN THERE. We’ve all felt the uncertainty at some point in our careers. What’s next for me? What happens if the company were to close? Who is taking over after our owner retires? There seems to be so much ambiguity and maybe even some assumptions. But it’s all speculation. Because no one is actually talking about it. It’s unclear and it’s frustrating. But you’re not alone. Companies every day struggle to put together a future picture. A plan for succession.

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Have You Created Your Individual Development Plan?

4 Minute Read

If you do research on how to create an individual development plan (IDP), you’ll probably notice that the advice you find is typically offered to a leader or manager, helping to develop an IDP for their employee.

They all start with the notion that first, you should know where the business is going and then talk with your employee about the future. Next, it’ll walk you through determining what the person is missing (gap analysis). Finally, it ends with creating a training plan and applying it. You might even find some lists that have a few more steps, but the majority contain at least those steps.

But why wait for your manager to create an Individual Development Plan?

Managers are busy. Sometimes they are lucky to get 1:1 meetings done, let alone helping someone write a plan to develop their career. So our advice? Take your future into your own hands and get started.

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Executives are the Reason Development Efforts Fail

5 Minute Read

This might be a touchy subject. But we have to say it. You are the reason your people aren’t learning, growing, and fully engaging.

Picture this all-too-familiar scenario. An employee is struggling to get things done. He’s missing deadlines and always seems rushed or stressed, especially if you ask him to do anything extra. His manager notices these behaviors and immediately diagnoses the problem. He picks up the phone. “Um, yes, HR Person, John needs time management training. What can we offer?”

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The Importance of Developing High Potentials

3 Minute Read

Why should you develop high potential employees? This seems like a ridiculous question.  Isn’t it obvious why you should develop your high potentials? Yet so many companies take their high potentials for granted.  It’s easy to do.  Think about these individuals in your organization.  They often outwork their peers, get along well with others and, usually, if they want or need to learn something, they’ll take it upon themselves to figure it out.  They ask the right questions, don’t create drama, and are all-in. Let’s call them our HPs.

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Transforming the Employee Evaluation

3 Minute Read

As a supervisor, giving an employee evaluation can be dreadful. You start by staring at yet another blank form. You go through each performance category, carefully marking your choice of below average, average, or above average. And when done, you recheck your responses, making sure that the report is “balanced.” Too many low marks, and your employee might be upset. Too many high and there is nowhere to aspire. What is the answer? Rank the employee in the middle…the sweet spot! Not hanging back, not showing off. The solution is average.

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