communication

How Do Your Communication Skills Measure Up?

4 Minute Read

Communication: It’s an exchange. A process of sharing your thoughts, ideas, or feelings with another person. It’s easy right? We all communicate perfectly…Not so much. Especially today, the ability to communicate effectively is one of the most critical skills an employee or manager must have. Whether it be remote or face-to-face, it’s key to have people in your company that are transparent, assertive, and positive; otherwise it’s almost certain you’ll feel a shift in your company’s culture…if you haven’t already. For communication to be effective, it requires great skill in both listening and speaking. Here are a few tips to improve your skills as a communicator.

Read More

Making Work Meaningful: Inspire. Engage. Ignite.

3 Minute Read

For years, company leaders have had the belief that employees can be motivated by more money. If they’re not happy with their jobs, just give them a raise! But studies have shown that this method of motivation doesn’t always work. It’s about making work meaningful for your employees. Think about it. What makes you get out of bed and come to work every day? What drives you to stay late working on a project with your team?

Dan Ariely, a behavioral economist and speaker, says the answer is that we care about reaching the end. We care about the fight and the challenge of getting there. We care about making our lives meaningful. And that means that you, as a leader, should also be making work meaningful for those you lead.

Read More

How to hold people accountable without ruining relationships.

4 Minute Read

Picture this scenario: People at work are unengaged. You can feel your direct reports whispering about you around the water cooler. Sometimes you feel walked on. And your team thinks that they can get away with anything…because you won’t do anything about it. Does any of this sound familiar?


Having crucial conversations with your team is hard. We know our employees have good intentions. But sometimes, they make mistakes, or we need to correct performance issues. And holding them accountable for missing the mark can be extremely uncomfortable. You don’t want to hurt feelings and you don’t want to create a combative environment. But issues arise when we, as managers, are scared to ask our teams to take responsibility for their actions. Here are some quick dos and don’ts to keep in mind.

DO: Foster communication.

Before you even try to hold people accountable for their actions and goals, you need to create an environment that encourages communication. Find out something about your team members: their hobbies, their interests, their family, their values. Create a base level of trust.

  • DON’T: Be their best friend. We get it. It is fun to have friends at work! And it shows that you care about your team. But there is a line. It becomes difficult when you must go from friend to manager and actually hold your team accountable.

 

DO: Set clear expectations.

The first step is to ensure that your employees know exactly what success looks like. What is the outcome you’re expecting? How should it be accomplished? How will we know that it was accomplished? Work to create alignment and focus within the team.

  • DON’T: Expect your team to know everything. Let your team know that it is okay to ask questions. And sometimes people don’t have questions until they get into the weeds of the project.

 

DO: Make it measurable.

In order to set a clear goal, it must be measurable. If it isn’t measurable, how will you ever know it is finished? Think about these questions: How Much? How Many? Who is involved? How long will it take? What is the desired outcome?

  • DON’T: Be vague. Or create goals that require interpretation. Your opinion or perspective might be different from your employee’s.

 

DO: Explain the potential consequences.

If the job doesn’t get done correctly or on time, how does that impact your clients? Your team? Your company as a whole? What does that mean for the person or people who didn’t get the job done correctly? Set the precedent upfront that you are fully expecting to hold people accountable.

  • DON’T: Make accountability taboo. Why is it even taboo anyway? Start the conversation, create a discussion, respond to concerns, and know when to draw the hard line.

 

DO: Train, coach, and be available.

You can’t just give your team a project and then cross your fingers and hope that it gets done correctly and on time. You need to ask the questions to see if your team has the skills to get the job done. And if not, you need to train them. You will also need to coach your team and encourage problem-solving. Start by asking questions like: “What have you tried so far?”, “What has or hasn’t worked?”, “What could you do to fix that?” Be available when they need you, but don’t provide all the answers.

  • DON’T: Micromanage. Is there anything worse than your boss standing over your shoulder watching your every move? You feel stuck, like you’re doing something wrong and second-guessing yourself at every turn. Do you think your employees feel any different? It is okay to let them make mistakes because mistakes lead to coaching moments, which leads to a more independent workforce.

 

DO: Give consistent feedback.

Be specific and give feedback in multiple avenues. Consistent feedback sounds scary. Who has time for that?! You do. Feedback does not need to be a formalized “sit–down” anymore. Stop by their desk, send a text or email, have a video conference or give them a quick call. Be specific in your feedback. What was done correctly?  What wasn’t what you were expecting? And how can they get back on track?

  • DON’T: Only focus on the negative. When we do this, we start keeping score. And we become that manager that no one wants to hear from.

 

By remembering these simple actions, you can create a relationship with your team that allows them to know that you are there for them; that you want them to succeed; that you will give them the tools to do so; and how uncorrected poor performance will impact the team and the organization. At the end of the day, “I tried” isn’t always the best business model. Results must still be achieved. And everybody wants to be a part of those results. How can you set the stage for your team to be successful?

Watch this video on accountability to find out how to hold people accountable!

What Candyland Can Teach You About Leadership

3 Minute Read

Do you remember Candyland? You know, the board game with the colorful slides and lollipops. Many of us played it as kids…but have you ever played it as an adult with a toddler? Typically, they start the game off really strong, making sure they are counting the colors on the cards, paying attention to where they are at on the board, and working really hard on not cheating.

Read More

Lessons from Dad, CEO: Conflict in the Family Business

4 Minute Read

Lesson Two:  We’re all in this together…believe in one another. A guide to navigating conflict in the family business.

Every family has unique dynamics and each member carves out a role that just seems to fit his/her strengths. Among the many roles, there is usually the role of “person in charge,” the role of “peacekeeper,” the role of “challenger,” and the role of “planner/organizer.” And in some cases, multiple people want the same role; which can cause conflict in the family business. To add to that, the role in the family may not match the position they hold within the company.

Read More

#AskRevela – Upward Communication

4 Minute Read

Let us be your leadership “Google.” Ask Revela!

Read More

Business Could Be Better…

2 Minute Read

We’ve all been there. Things sometimes just aren’t going as you hoped. You know business could be better. You know your team could be performing better. As you see it, others are doing things in an illogical way or maybe they just don’t get it. This can be frustrating and not very motivating. So what can you do about it?

Read More

Building Relationships

2 Minute Read

We’ve all been busy…really busy. And many times we get so caught up in saving a minute here, or an hour there, that we lose many of the qualities that make life worth living — particularly the quality and joy that others can bring to our lives.

Success in business or in your personal life can become meaningless if there is no one available to share the fruits of that success. Therefore, setting aside time for building relationships with others is very important.

Read More

What’s your Trademark?™

4 Minute Read

We have a question for you: Is the experience you provide as important as the actual product or service that you are selling? In the field of coaching and training, we get to hear all kinds of stories related to both internal and external customer service. Usually, they begin with something like, “You’ll never believe what happened to me! This guy was so rude! He didn’t listen, and all I did was repeat myself!”

Read More

Drama Carriers: Do you know one?

2 Minute Read

Oh my, gosh!  The drama!

Every once in a while, we’ll be working with a team and they will proclaim their frustration with the ‘drama’ in their workplace. You know…people blaming others without knowing the whole story. Talking about how others are wrong and don’t get it. The back and forth emails that don’t resolve anything. Copying everyone in the world on emails to prove just how ‘right’ they are. Snide comments between co-workers.

Read More